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      BIOL 401 Introductory Biochemistry
    The first part of a one-year Biochemistry series. This semester covers the basic principles of biological chemistry with particular focus on: proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids; their molecular structure, chemical reactions, and practical methods in characterization; and enzymes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(BIOL 107 with min. grade of D) OR (BIOL 115 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] AND [(CHEM 237 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      BIOL 403 Biochemistry Lecture
    Molecular organization of cell structures and cell membranes. Proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, their molecular structure, characterization and chemical reactions. Enzymes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions and metabolism. Does not satisfy biochemistry requirement for Biology, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biochemistry and Biophysics majors.(4-0-4) Prerequisite: [(BIOL 107 with min. grade of D) OR (BIOL 115 with min. grade of D) OR (CHE 311 with min. grade of D)] AND [(CHEM 237 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    BIOL 426 Concepts of Cancer Biology
    The course is designed to provide a complete overview of cancer as a disease. It will cover normal and abnormal cell signaling pathways, cancer genes and their regulation, experimental chemical carcinogenesis, metastasis, cancer prevention and therapy, drug development for cancer treatment, cancers of individual organ sites and application of biotechnology for cancer detection and treatment.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(BIOL 107 with min. grade of D, BIOL 115 with min. grade of D, BIOL 401* with min. grade of D, BIOL 445* with min. grade of D, and CHEM 237 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
      BIOL 495 Biology Colloquium
    Lectures by prominent scientists. This course exposes students to current and active research in biology both within and outside the IIT community. It helps prepare students for a career in research. It is complementary to our academic courses and provides examples of professional/scientific presentations. This course may not be used to satisfy the natural science general education requirement.(1-0-1) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    BIOL 504 Biochemistry Lecture
    Molecules of biological significance; reaction thermodynamics and kinetics; metabolism; cellular localization of biochemical function; proteins; nucleic acids; transcription; translation.(4-0-4) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      BIOL 515 Molecular Biology
    A survey of topics including structure of nucleic acids, translation, transcription, replication, organization of DNA, RNA processing, genomics, and control of gene expression.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(BIOL 401) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      BIOL 524 Science and Law: An Introduction to Intellectual Property Law and Patents
    This course focuses on the interaction of science and law, specifically intellectual property. Topics will include patents, the ethical and legal issues involved with gene patenting, inventorship and collaborations, trade secrets, and the legal system as it relates to intellectual property.(0-1-2) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      BIOL 526 Developmental Biology
    This course covers the cellular and molecular processes involved in generating an embryo, in creating various tissues and organs, and the effect of external stimuli on development. Topics include: genome structure, gene expression and regulation, cell cycle control, pattern formation, signal transduction, gametogenesis, organogenesis, and methods used in studying developmental biology. In addition to studies of model organisms, examples relevant to human diseases are covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      BIOL 527 Immunology and Immunochemistry
    Basic concepts of immunology, immunochemistry, both biological and molecular.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      BIOL 562 Current Topics in Functional Genomics
    This course is designed to give students a foundation in advanced theoretical and applied methods in modern molecular research. It will emphasize both established and novel approaches to solving problems of functional and comparative genomics, and systems biology. It will also focus on applications of advanced molecular techniques in areas of significant economic and biomedical importance.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(BIOL 515)] Corequisite: None
      BIOL 595 Biology Colloquium
    Lectures by invited scientists in areas of biology generally not covered in the department.(1-0-1) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    CAE 301 Hydraulics and Hydrology
    Collection and distribution of water. Flow of fluids through orifices, weirs, venturi meters. Laminar and turbulent flow in closed conduits. Open channel flow. Model analysis using the principles of dimensional analysis. Rainfall and runoff.(2-3-3) Prerequisite: [(MATH 252* with min. grade of D)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
      CAE 424 Introduction to Fire Dynamics
    Introduction to fire, physics and chemistry, and mass and heat transfer principles, fire fluid mechanic fundamentals, fundamentals and requirements of the burning of materials (gases, liquids, and solids), fire phenomena in enclosures such as pre-flashover and post-flashover.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CAE 209) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      CAE 461 Plumbing and Fire Protection Design
    Study of plumbing systems, water supply, and venting systems. Study of fire protection systems for buildings including pipe sizing, pumps, sprinklers, gravity and pressure vessels, and controls.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CAE 209 with min. grade of D) OR (CAE 302 with min. grade of D) OR (MMAE 310 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      CAE 463 Building Enclosure Design
    Design of building exteriors, including the control of heat flow, air and moisture penetration, building movements, and deterioration. Study of the principle of rain screen walls and of energy conserving designs. Analytical techniques and building codes are discussed through case studies and design projects.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CAE 331 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    CAE 470 Construction Methods and Cost Estimating
    The role of estimating in construction contract administration. Types of estimates. Unit costs and production rates; job costs. Preparing bid for complete building project using manual methods and the CSI format; checking quantity take-off and cost estimating in selected divisions using a computer package.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      CAE 510 Dynamics of Fire
    Introduction to fire, physics and chemistry, and mass and heat transfer principles, fire fluid mechanic fundamentals, fundamentals and requirements of the burning of materials (gases, liquids, & solids), fire phenomena in enclosures such as pre-flashover and post-flashover.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      CAE 524 Building Enclosure Design
    Design of building exteriors, including the control of heat flow, air and moisture penetration, building movements, and deterioration. Study of the principle of rain screen walls and of energy conserving designs. Analytical techniques and building codes are discussed through case studies and design projects.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CAE 513) OR (CAE 531)] Corequisite: None
      CAE 561 Structural Reliability and Probabilistic Bases of Design
    Fundamentals of probability theory and stochastic processes; statistical analysis of engineering data; probabilistic modeling of structural loads and material properties. Reliability analysis and design of structure, reliability-based design criteria. Evaluation of existing design codes. Safety analysis of structures under fatigue loads. Fault and event tree analysis.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CAE 307)] Corequisite: None
    CAE 593 Civil Engineering Seminar
    Reports on current research. Graduate students are expected to register and attend.(1-0-0) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    CHE 406 Transport Phenomena
    The equations of change in different coordinate systems (mass, momentum, and energy transport). Velocity distribution in laminar and turbulent flow. Formulation and analytical solutions to the problems of viscous flow, molecular diffusion, heat conduction and convection.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CHE 301 with min. grade of D, CHE 302 with min. grade of D, and MATH 252 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      CHE 470 Introduction to Polymer Science
    An introduction to the basic principles that govern the synthesis, processing and properties of polymeric materials. Topics include classifications, synthesis methods, physical and chemical behavior, characterization methods, processing technologies and applications. Same as CHEM 470 and MMAE 470.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CHEM 124 with min. grade of D, MATH 251 with min. grade of D, and PHYS 221 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    CHE 535 Applications of Mathematics to Chemical Engineering
    Mathematical techniques and their application to the analytical and numerical solution of chemical engineering problems. The analytical component includes review of matrices and determinants, as well as solution of ordinary, partial differential and integral equations. The numerical component includes iterative solution of algebraic equations, numerical analysis and solution of ordinary differential equations. Core course.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    CHE 542 Fluidization and Gas-Solids Flow Systems
    Fluidization phenomena (bubbling, slugging, elutriation, and jets in fluidized beds). Multiphase flow approach to fluidization and gas/solids flow systems. Kinetic theory approach to fluid/particle flow systems. Analysis of flow of particles in pneumatic conveying lines (dilute flow) and stand pipe (dense flow). Hydrodynamic analysis of spouted and circulating fluidized beds. Examples from current literature on applications of multiphase flow.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CHE 501 and CHE 535)] Corequisite: None
    CHE 543 Energy, Environment and Economics
    The linkage of energy, environmental and economic issues. The impact of energy supply and end use on human well-being and the ecosystem. A comprehensive approach to the resolution of resource, technical, economic, strategic, environmental, socio- and geopolitical problems of the energy industries. Pathways to a sustainable global energy system.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    CHE 553 Advanced Thermodynamics
    Advanced thermodynamics for research-oriented graduate students. The course covers the fundamental postulates of thermodynamics and introductory statistical mechanics, with applications to pure fluids, fluid mixtures, elastic solids, surfaces and macromolecules.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CHE 351 and CHE 451) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    CHE 577 Bioprocess Engineering
    Application of engineering principles to the biological production processes. Enzyme kinetics, cell culture kinetics, transport phenomena in cells, membranes, and biological reactors ,genetics, bioseparation and downstream processing, energetics of metabolic pathways, operation modes of cell cultures, mixed and their applications.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    CHE 580 Biomaterials
    Metal, ceramic, and polymeric implant materials. Structure-property relationships for biomaterials. Interactions of biomaterials with tissue. Selection and design of materials for medical implants.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    CHEM 505 Spectroscopic Methods
    Theories of spectroscopic transitions and their applications in structural elucidations and quantitative analysis. Topics include ultraviolet/visible, infrared, Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    CHEM 513 Statistics for Analytical Chemists
    A survey providing sufficient statistical background for scientists. The topics covered include probability, statistics, sampling estimation, regression analysis, experimental design, data analysis and signal enhancement.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      CHEM 515 Gas Chromatography -- Theory and Practice
    This course will cover theory and concepts of gas chromatographic analysis and its practical application in solving analytical problems. Topics include basic theory of chromatographic separation, separation dynamics, instrumentation, column selection, quantitative techniques, and practical applications.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      CHEM 519 Good Manufacturing Practices
    This course provides an introduction to current good manufacturing practices (GMP) regulations and their implementation to different areas of the manufacturing process such as laboratory records, equipment, personnel, facilities, etc. The course will help students to recognize the regulatory actions and financial risks for non-compliance.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      CHEM 522 Efficient Chemical and Materials Synthesis
    The design and development of environmentally benign chemical pathways: challenges and opportunities. High-yield and zero-waste chemical processes. Representative processes.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      COM 421 Technical Communication
    Principles and practice in the communication of technical materials. Students work on the design, writing, and revising of reports, articles, manuals, procedures, proposals, including the use of graphics. Works by modern writers are analyzed.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: Satisfaction of IIT's Basic Writing Proficiency Requirement Corequisite: None
      COM 424 Document Design
    Principles and strategies for effective document and information design, focusing on print media. Students design, produce, and evaluate documents for a variety of applications, such as instructional materials, brochures, newsletters, graphics, and tables.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: Satisfaction of IIT's Basic Writing Proficiency Requirement Corequisite: None
      COM 425 Editing
    Principles and practical applications of editing at all levels, working with both hard and soft copy and including copymarking, copyediting, proofreading, grammar and style, and comprehensive editing. Attention primarily to documents from science, technology, and business.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(HUM 102 with min. grade of D) OR (HUM 104 with min. grade of D) OR (HUM 106 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      COM 523 Communicating Science
    This course focuses on strategies for communicating scientific information in professional settings. Students develop a literature review, proposal, and feasibility study; learn how to adapt scientific information to various audiences; and complete exercises on style, grammar, and other elements of effective professional communication. Emphasis on usability, cohesion, and style in each assignment.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      COM 528 Document Design
    Principles and strategies for effective document and information design focusing on print media and familiarizing students with current research and theory as well as with practices in document design. Students design, produce, and evaluate documents for a variety of applications, such as instructional materials, brochures, newsletters, graphics, and tables.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      COM 529 Technical Editing
    Principles and practical applications of editing at all levels, working with both hard and soft copy and including copymarking, copyediting, proofreading, grammar and style, and comprehensive editing. Attention primarily to documents from science, technology, and business.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    CS 401 Introduction to Advanced Studies I
    First course in a two-course sequence that is designed to prepare students for graduate study in computer science. Explores the implementation and application of fundamental data structures and algorithms with an emphasis on object-oriented programming in Java. Examines the relationship between these elements and the mathematical structures that form the foundation of computer science. This course does not apply toward M. S./Ph. D. credit in Computer Science.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 200) OR (CS 201)] Corequisite: None
    CS 402 Introduction to Advanced Studies II
    Second course in a two-course sequence that is designed to prepare students for graduate study in computer science. Explores the development of the multiple layers of software that form a sophisticated software system, from device drivers to application interfaces to user interfaces. Examines how computer architecture influences software development. Emphasizes the design and implementation of interrupt-driven/event-driven software.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 401)] Corequisite: None
    CS 411 Computer Graphics
    Overview of display devices and applications. Vector graphics in two and three dimensions. Image generation, representation, and manipulation. Homogeneous coordinates. Modeling and hidden line elimination. Introduction to raster graphics. Perspective and parallel projections.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 331) OR (CS 401) OR (CS 403)] Corequisite: None
    CS 425 Database Organization
    Overview of database architectures, including the Relational, Hierarchical, Network, and Object Models. Database interfaces, including the SQL query language. Database design using the Entity-Relationship Model. Issues such as security, integrity, and query optimization.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 331 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 401) OR (CS 403)] Corequisite: None
    CS 430 Introduction to Algorithms
    Introduction to the design, behavior, and analysis of computer algorithms. Searching, sorting, and combinatorial algorithms are emphasized. Worst case, amortized, and expected bounds on time and space usage.(3-1-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 330 with min. grade of D and CS 331 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 331 with min. grade of D and MATH 230 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 401) OR (CS 403)] Corequisite: None
    CS 440 Programming Languages and Translators
    Study of commonly used computer programming languages with an emphasis on precision of definition and facility in use. Scanning, parsing, and introduction to compiler design. Use of compiler generating tools.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 330 with min. grade of D and CS 331 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 331 with min. grade of D and MATH 230 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 401 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 403 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    CS 445 Object Oriented Design and Programming
    Introduction to methodologies for object-oriented design and programming. Examines the object model and how it is realized in various object-oriented languages. Focuses on methods for developing and implementing object-oriented systems.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 331 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 401 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 403 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    CS 450 Operating Systems
    Introduction to operating system concepts-including system organization for uniprocessors and multiprocessors, scheduling algorithms, process management, deadlocks, paging and segmentation, files and protection, and process coordination and communication.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 351 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 401 and CS 402) OR (CS 403)] Corequisite: None
    CS 455 Data Communications
    Introduction to data communication concepts and facilities with an emphasis on protocols and interface specifications. Focuses on the lower four layers of the ISO-OSI reference model.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 450 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
      CS 456 Introduction to Wireless Networks and Performance
    This class provides an opportunity for students to obtain a fundamental understanding of the nature and operation of the full range of wireless networks (personal, local area, wide area, and satellite) and their performance characteristics, future potential, and challenges through class lectures, assigned readings, homework, projects, and various hands-on experiences.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 350 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 401 with min. grade of D and CS 402 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 403 with min. grade of D) OR (ECE 242 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    CS 458 Information Security
    An introduction to the fundamentals of computer and information security. This course focuses on algorithms and techniques used to defend against malicious software. Topics include an introduction to encryption systems, operating system security, database security, network security, system threats, and risk avoidance procedures.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 425 with min. grade of D and CS 450 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    CS 480 Artificial Intelligence Planning and Control
    Introduction to computational methods for intelligent control of autonomous agents, and the use of programming paradigms that support development of flexible and reactive systems. These include heuristic search, knowledge representation, constraint satisfaction, probabilistic reasoning, decision-theoretic control, and sensor interpretation. Particular focus will be places on real-world application of the material.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 331 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 401 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 403 with min. grade of D)] AND [(MATH 474* with min. grade of D)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
    CS 487 Software Engineering I
    Study of the principles and practices of software engineering. Topics include software quality concepts, process models, software requirements analysis, design methodologies, software testing and software maintenance. Hands-on experience building a software system using the waterfall life cycle model. Students work in teams to develop all life cycle deliverables: requirements document, specification and design documents, system code, test plan, and user manuals.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 331 with min. grade of D) OR (CS 401) OR (CS 403)] AND [(CS 425)] Corequisite: None
    CS 530 Theory of Computation
    Computability topics such as Turing machines, nondeterministic machines, undecidability, and reducibility. Computational complexity topics such as time complexity, NP-completeness and intractability, time and space hierarchy theorems. Introduces the complexity classes P, NP, NL, L, PSPACE, NC, RNC, BPP and their complete problems.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 430)] Corequisite: None
    CS 535 Design and Analysis of Algorithms
    Design of efficient algorithms for a variety of problems, with mathematical proof of correctness and analysis of time and space requirements. Topics include lower bounds for sorting and medians, amortized analysis of advanced data structures, graph algorithms (strongly connected components, shortest paths, minimum spanning trees, maximum flows and bipartite matching) and NP-Completeness.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 430)] Corequisite: None
    CS 536 Science of Programming
    Formal specification of how programs execute operational semantics , how mathematical functions programs compute denotational semantics , and how to use logic to characterize properties and invariants of the program execution (axiomatic semantics).(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 331) OR (CS 401)] Corequisite: None
    CS 542 Computer Networks I Fundamentals
    This course focuses on the engineering and analysis of network protocols and architecture in terms of the Internet. Topics include content distribution, peer-to-peer networking, congestion control, unicast and multicast routing, router design, mobility, multimedia networking quality of service, security and policy-based networking.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 455)] Corequisite: None
    CS 544 Computer Networks II: Network Services
    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of networks. A combination of analytical and experimental analysis techniques will be used to study topics such as protocol delay, end-to-end network response time, intranet models, Internet traffic models, web services availability, and network management.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 542) OR (ECE 545)] Corequisite: None
    CS 550 Advanced Operating Systems
    Advanced operating system design concepts such as interprocess communication, distributed processing, replication and consistency, fault tolerance, synchronization, file systems. Study of systems highlighting these concepts.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 450)] Corequisite: None
    CS 551 Operating System Design and Implementation
    This course covers in detail the design and implementation of processes, interprocess communication, semaphores, monitors, message passing, scheduling algorithm, input/output, device drivers, memory management, file system design, security and protection mechanisms. The hardware-software interface and the user process-system call-kernel interface are examined in detail. Students modify and extend a multiuser operating system.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 450)] Corequisite: None
    CS 552 Distributed Real-Time Systems
    With the advancement of computer hardware, embedded devices, and network technology, real-time applications have become pervasive, ranging from smart automobiles to automated traffic control. Different from general-purpose applications, correct executions of real-time applications depend on both functional correctness and temporal correctness. This course is to study the fundamentals of distributed real-time computing with the focus on its temporal aspects.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 450)] Corequisite: None
      CS 554 Data-Intensive Computing
    This course is a tour through various research topics in distributed data-intensive computing, covering topics in cluster computing, grid computing, supercomputing, and cloud computing. The course will explore solutions and learn design principles for building large network-based computational systems to support data-intensive computing. This course is geared for junior/senior-level undergraduates and graduate students in computer science.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 450)] Corequisite: None
      CS 557 Cyber-Physical Systems: Networking and Algorithms
    The goal of the course is to provide students with the necessary foundations to apply wireless sensor networking, scheduling theory, and algorithms in the field of computer science. The focus is to discuss and understand the challenges in emerging cyber-physical systems, open distributed real-time systems, and wireless sensor networks. The course will examine different perspectives of wireless networks such as various MAC protocols, routing protocols, scheduling protocols, localization, clock synchronization, data aggregation and data fusion, compressive and cooperative sensing, security, fault detection and diagnosis, online program, and networked control systems. The course will also examine the interaction of different systems.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    CS 584 Machine Learning
    Introduce fundamental problems in machine learning. Provide understanding of techniques, mathematical concepts, and algorithms used in machine learning. Provide understanding of the limitations of various machine learning algorithms and the way to evaluate performance of learning algorithms. Topics include introduction, regression, kernel methods, generative learning, discriminative learning, neural networks, support vector machines, graphical models, unsupervised learning, and dimensionality reduction.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 430)] Corequisite: None
    CS 587 Software Project Management
    Concepts of software product and process quality. Role of TQM in software project management. Use of metrics, feasibility studies, cost and effort estimates. Discussion of project planning and scheduling. The project team and leadership issues. The Capability Maturity Model: basic tenets and application of process evaluation.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 487)] Corequisite: None
    CS 589 Software Testing and Analysis
    Concepts and techniques for testing and analysis of software. Software testing at the unit, subsystem, and system levels. Specification-based testing. Code-based testing. Model-based testing. Methods for test generation and validation. Static and dynamic analysis. Formal methods and verification. Reliability analysis.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 487)] Corequisite: None
    CSP 585 Object-Oriented Design Patterns
    This course introduces the principles of design patterns for Object-Oriented software systems. A catalog of design patterns is shown, to illustrate the roles of patterns in designing and contracting complex software systems. The catalog of design patterns also provides a pragmatic reference to a well-engineered set of existing patterns currently in use. Also discussed is the impact of post-object oriented software development on design patterns.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 445)] Corequisite: None
    CSP 587 Software Quality Management
    Students will learn methods of software quality management. this will include exposure to software quality assurance, quality measures, and quality control. These quality management methods will be explained at the applications level.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 487)] Corequisite: None
    CSP 595 Topics: User-Centered Design
    (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ECE 403 Digital and Data Communication Systems
    Introduction to Amplitude, Phase, and Frequency modulation systems. Multiplexing and Multi-Access Schemes; Spectral design considerations. Sampling theorem. Channel capacity, entropy; Quantization, wave shaping, and Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI), Matched filters, Digital source encoding, Pulse Modulation systems. Design for spectral efficiency and interference control. Probability of error analysis, Analysis and design of digital modulators and detectors.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 308 with min. grade of D and MATH 474 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      ECE 407 Introduction to Computer Networks with Laboratory
    Emphasis on the physical, data link, and medium access layers of the OSI architecture. Different general techniques for networking tasks, such as error control, flow control, multiplexing, switching, routing, signaling, congestion control, traffic control, scheduling will be covered along with their experimentation and implementation in a laboratory. Credit given for ECE 407 or ECE 408, not both.(3-3-4) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ECE 408 Introduction to Computer Networks
    Emphasis on the physical, data link and medium access layers of the OSI architecture. Different general techniques for networking tasks, such as error control, flow control, multiplexing, switching, routing, signaling, congestion control, traffic control, scheduling will be covered. Credit given for ECE 407 or ECE 408, not both.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ECE 418 Power System Analysis
    Transmission systems analysis and design. Large scale network analysis using Newton-Raphson load flow. Unsymmetrical short-circuit studies. Detailed consideration of the swing equation and the equal-area criterion for power system stability studies. Credit will be given for ECE 418 or ECE 419, but not for both.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 319 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 425 Analysis and Design of Integrated Circuits
    Contemporary analog and digital integrated circuit analysis and design techniques. Bipolar, CMOS and BICMOS IC fabrication technologies, IC Devices and Modeling, Analog ICs including multiple-transistor amplifiers, biasing circuits, active loads, reference circuits, output buffers; their frequency response, stability and feedback consideration. Digital ICs covering inverters, combinational logic gates, high-performance logic gates, sequential logics, memory and array structures.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 312 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 429 Introduction to VLSI Design
    Processing, fabrication, and design of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) circuits. MOS transistor theory, VLSI processing, circuit layout, layout design rules, layout analysis, and performance estimation. The use of computer aided design (CAD) tools for layout design, system design in VLSI, and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs). In the laboratory, students create, analyze, and simulate a number of circuit layouts as design projects, culminating in a term design project.(3-3-4) Prerequisite: [(ECE 218 with min. grade of D and ECE 311 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      ECE 485 Computer Organization and Design
    This course covers basic concepts and state-of-the-art developments in computer architecture: computer technology, performance measures, instruction set design, computer arithmetic, controller and datapath design, memory systems, pipelining, array processing, parallel processing, multiprocessing, abstract analysis models, input-output systems, relationship between computer design and application requirements, and cost/performance tradeoffs. Students will complete a project implementing a version of multiple-cycle processor. Credit will be given for either ECE 485 or CS 470, but not both.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 218 with min. grade of D and ECE 242 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 504 Wireless Communication System Design
    Fundamentals of first (1G), second (2G), third (3G), and future generation cellular communication systems. This course covers the transition from 1G to 3G systems. Topics included are speech and channel encoders, interleaving, encryption, equalization, modulation formats, multi-user detection, smart antennas, technologies that are used in these transitions, and future generations of cellular systems. Compatibility aspects of digital cellular systems are discussed along with a review of the standards for the industry. TDMA and CDMA systems are covered in detail.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 513)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 505 Applied Optimization for Engineers
    Principles of optimization for practical engineering problems, linear programming, nonlinear unconstrained optimization, nonlinear constrained optimization, dynamic programming.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ECE 508 Video Communications
    This course covers the fundamentals of video coding and communications. The principles of source coding for the efficient storage and transmission of digital video will be covered. State-of-the-art video coding standards and error-resilient video coding techniques will be introduced. Recent technologies for robust transmission of video data over wired/wireless networks will be discussed. A detailed overview of architectural requirements for supporting video communications will be presented. Error control and cross-layer optimization techniques for wireless video communications will be covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 437 and ECE 511)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 511 Analysis of Random Signals
    Probability theory, including discrete and continuous random variables, functions and transformations of random variables. Random processes, including correlation and spectral analysis, the Gaussian process and the response of linear systems to random processes.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 308 and MATH 474) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 513 Communication Engineering Fundamentals
    Review of probability and random processes. AM with noise, FM with noise. Introduction to digital communication. Source coding, signal space analysis, channel modulations, optimum receiver design, channel encoding.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 403 and MATH 474) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 535 Discrete Time Systems
    Discrete systems. Sampling and reconstruction procedures. Transform techniques of analysis and synthesis. State space techniques. Discrete controllability, observability and stability. Compensation and digital controllers.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 438) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 541 Performance Evaluation of Computer Networks
    Introduction to performance evaluation techniques for computer and communication networks. Little's theorem, birth-death processes, M/G/1 queue, product from queuing networks, approximation techniques for G/G/1 queues and non-product form queuing networks. Discrete event simulations, generation of random variables, variance reduction techniques and general purpose simulation languages.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 407 and MATH 474) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 550 Power Electronic Dynamics and Control
    Modeling an analysis of solid-state switching circuits, parallel module dynamics, multi-converter interactions, resonant converters, feedback control, stability assessment, reduced parts converters, integrated structures, programmable switching regulators, digital switch-mode controllers, and power electronic converter-on-a-chip development.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 411) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 552 Adjustable Speed Drives
    Fundamentals of electric machines, basic principles of variable speed controls, field orientation theory, direct torque control, vector of AC drives, induction machines, switched reluctance and synchronous reluctance motors, permanent magnet brushless DC drives, converter topologies of DC and AC drives, and sensorless operation.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 411) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 553 Power System Planning
    Model development. Interchange capability, interconnections, pooling. Economic generator size and site selection. Concept of reserves, transformers, relays and circuit breakers. Reactive planning AC and DC systems are explored thoroughly from a planning standpoint.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 418) OR (ECE 419) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 556 Power Market Economics and Security
    This course covers simulation and scheduling tools used in restructured power system for studying the economics and security of power systems. Topics include modeling of generating units (thermal units, combined-cycle units, fuel-switching/blending units, hydro units, pumped-storage units, photovoltaic, wind), Lagrangian Relaxation-based scheduling, mixed integer programming-based scheduling, and Benders decomposition-based transmission security analyses. The simulation and scheduling tools consider different time scales including on-line security, day-ahead, operational planning, and long-term. The simulation and scheduling tools consider interdependency of supply (such as gas, water, renewable sources of energy) and electricity systems.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 420) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 558 Power System Reliability
    The concept of reliability, reliability indices, component reliability, generation capacity reserve evaluation, transmission system reliability, bulk power system reliability, distributed system reliability, reliability modeling in context.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 418) OR (ECE 419) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 567 Statistical Signal Processing
    Detection theory and hypothesis testing. Introduction to estimation theory. Properties of estimators, Gauss-Markov theorem. Estimation of random variables: conditional mean estimates, linear minimum mean-square estimation, orthogonality principle, Wiener and Kalman filters. Adaptive filtering. LMS algorithm: properties and applications.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 511 and MATH 333) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      ECE 571 Nanodevices and Technology
    Electronic properties and quantum effects. Dielectric, magnetic, and optical properties and their characterizations. Individual nanoparticles and clusters. Carbon nanotubes. Solid disordered nanostructures. Nanostructured crystals. Quantum wells, wires, and dots. Giant magnetoresistance. Material processing techniques. Devices and systems based on nanostructures. Prerequisite: Knowledge in quantum mechanics and thermodynamics.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ECE 584 VLSI Architecture for Signal Processing and Communication Systems
    This course aims to convey knowledge of advanced concepts in VLSI signal processing. Emphasis is on the architectural research, design and optimization of signal processing systems used in telecommunications, compression, encryption and coding applications. Topics covered include the principles of datapath design; FIR and IIR filtering architectures; communication systems including OFDM, multirate signal processing; fast transforms and algorithms including fast Fourier transform; discrete cosine transform; Walsh-Hadamard transform; and wavelet transform. Furthermore, advanced computer arithmetic methods including Galois fields, CORDIC, residue number systems, distributed arithmetic, canonic signed digit systems and reduced adder graph algorithms are examined.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 429 and ECE 437) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      ECE 586 Fault Detection in Digital Circuits
    Essential elements in testing and testability of digital designs. Automatic tests generation algorithms and fault-simulation methods. Design methodologies to increase testability and decrease test generation costs. Techniques for built-in testing.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 446) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 587 Hardware/Software Codesign
    Computer-aided techniques for the joint design of hardware and software: specification, analysis, simulation and synthesis. Hardware/software partitioning, distributed system cosynthesis, application-specific instruction set design, interface cosynthesis, timing analysis for real-time systems.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(CS 201 and ECE 441) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECE 588 CAD Techniques for VLSI Design
    Overview of techniques and algorithms used in Computer-Aided Design (CAD) for VLSI circuits. Physical CAD tools, including placement, routing, symbolic layout and compaction. High-level CAD tools, including logic synthesis, silicon compilers and high-level synthesis. Recent developments in the field. Design, implementation and performance analysis of prototype CAD tools.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ECE 429) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    ECON 423 Economic Analysis of Capital Investments
    This course explores the valuation of proposed capital investments in both the public and private sectors. Students will learn how to determine the relevant cash flows associated with a proposed capital investment. Then, they will subject these cash flows to analysis by three major decision models that incorporate time value of the following money concepts: Net Present Value; Equivalent Uniform Benefit/Cost; and Internal Rate of Return. Students will also learn how to incorporate income taxes, inflation, risk, and capital rationing in the analysis of a project.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ENVE 463 Introduction to Air Pollution Control
    Air pollution sources and characteristics of source emissions, atmospheric reactions, effects of pollutants, and techniques of emission control; legal and administrative aspects of air pollution control.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ENVE 501 Environmental Chemistry
    Chemical processes in environmental systems, with an emphasis on equilibrium conditions in aquatic systems. The types of processes examined include acid-base, dissolution-precipitation, air-water exchange and oxidation-reduction reactions. Methods presented for describing chemical speciation include analytical and graphical techniques, as well as computer models. Core Course.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ENVE 506 Chemodynamics
    The dynamics of pollutant transfer in biogeochemical systems of the earth. The overall objective of this course is to introduce fundamental science and engineering principles needed to formulate creative, comprehensive solutions to transport problems; critically evaluate proposed solutions to transport problems; and acquire and integrate new information to build on these fundamentals. Core course.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ENVE 551 Industrial Waste Treatment
    Industrial waste sources and characteristics, significance of industrial waste as environmental pollutants; applications of standard and special treatment processes, including physical, chemical and biological systems.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ENVE 513*) OR (ENVE 542*)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
      ENVE 580 Hazardous Waste Engineering
    Sources and characteristics of hazardous wastes, legal aspects of hazardous waste management, significance of hazardous wastes as air, water and soil pollutants. Principles and applications of conventional and specialized hazardous waste control technologies.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ENVE 506*)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
    ENVE 590 Environmental Engineering Seminar
    Presentations on recent developments in the field by academic and industrial visitors(1-0-0) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FPE 201 Nutrition and Wellness
    Introduction to the basic principles of nutrition and the relationship of the human diet to health. Overview of the nutrition profession, the biological uses of nutrients, and tools for dietary planning and assessment in various settings. Examination of specific issues such as weight management, sports nutrition, food safety, the diet-disease relationship, and global nutrition. Analysis of special nutritional requirements and needs during the life cycle. Same as FST 201.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FPE 402 Research Project: Design, Delivery, and Dissemination
    This course is an introduction to designing, conducting, and reporting on scientific research. Topics will include defining a problem and creating a research proposal, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and a written and oral presentation of results. Same as FST 402.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FPE 502 Research Project: Design, Delivery, and Dissemination
    This course is an introduction to designing, conducting, and reporting on scientific research. Topics will include defining a problem and creating a research proposal, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and a written and oral presentation of results. Same as FST 502.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FPE 505 Food Microbiology
    Principles of occurrence and control. Importance of sanitation and prevention of public health problems. Microbiological contaminants and methods for their detection. Mechanisms of microbial inactivation. Core course. Prerequisite: Introductory Microbiology or Food Science.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FPE 524 Fundamentals in Food Science and Technology
    This course will cover the central food science issues encountered with storage and processing of all major American food commodities including meats, grains, confections, vegetables, eggs, and dairy. It will also review the relevant chemistry, physics and engineering required to understand common food-related unit operations such as drying, freezing, sterilization and radiation treatment of foods. An introduction to microbial and chemical issues of food quality and safety will also be covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      FPE 593 Seminar on Food Safety and Technology
    Students attend seminars offered during the semester. Each student is also required to give a 30 minute presentation on a topic of his/her interest or a research project on which she/he has worked. (Credit: 1 Hour)(1-0-1) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FST 201 Nutrition and Wellness
    Introduction to the basic principles of nutrition and the relationship of the human diet to health. Overview of the nutrition profession, the biological uses of nutrients, and tools for dietary planning and assessment in various settings. Examination of specific issues such as weight management, sports nutrition, food safety, the diet-disease relationship, and global nutrition. Analysis of special nutritional requirements and needs during the life cycle. Same as FPE 201.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FST 402 Research Project: Design, Delivery, and Dissemination
    This course is an introduction to designing, conducting, and reporting on scientific research. Topics will include defining a problem and creating a research proposal, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and a written and oral presentation of results. Same as FPE 402.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FST 502 Research Project: Design, Delivery, and Dissemination
    This course is an introduction to designing, conducting, and reporting on scientific research. Topics will include defining a problem and creating a research proposal, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and a written and oral presentation of results. Same as FPE 502.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FST 505 Food Microbiology
    Principles of occurrence and control. Importance of sanitation and prevention of public health problems. Microbiological contaminants and methods for their detection. Mechanisms of microbial inactivation. Core course. Prerequisite: Introductory Microbiology or Food Science.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    FST 524 Fundamentals in Food Science and Technology
    This course will cover the central food science issues encountered with storage and processing of all major American food commodities including meats, grains, confections, vegetables, eggs, and dairy. It will also review the relevant chemistry, physics and engineering required to understand common food-related unit operations such as drying, freezing, sterilization and radiation treatment of foods. An introduction to microbial and chemical issues of food quality and safety will also be covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      FST 593 Seminar on Food Safety and Technology
    Students attend seminars offered during the semester. Each student is also required to give a 30 minute presentation on a topic of his/her interest or a research project on which she/he has worked. (Credit: 1 Hour)(1-0-1) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 314 Maintenance Technology and Management
    Maintenance of facilities is a major concern for all industrial operations. Course covers technologies involved as well as the management aspects of maintaining buildings, construction and equipment installation and maintenance for all types of operations.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      INTM 315 Industrial Enterprises
    This course provides an introduction to the world of industrial enterprises. The world-wide evolution of business will be considered leading to today's competitive world. The range of industrial activities is reviewed, and students are introduced to the organization and purpose of various industrial sectors.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 319 Electronics in Industry
    Basic overview of electrical and electronic technology in industry. Emphasis on electrical and electronic components, industrial devices, electrical theory, application and basic troubleshooting. Students select and complete an electrical or electronic class project.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      INTM 404 Sales, Marketing and Product Introduction
    Covers techniques of marketing research, strategies for new product introduction, and sales management and planning.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 406 Quality Control
    This course focuses on how organizations manage quality in a competitive marketplace regardless of the nature of the industry. Topics include principles of quality, cost of quality, inspection and receiving, audits, corrective and preventive action systems, supplier performance management (SPM), FEMA and control plans, process capability studies and statistical process control (SPC), measurement system analysis, quality management systems (QMS), process improvement methodologies (Lean, Six Sigma, and Kaizen), and creation of a performance dashboard.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 408 Cost Management
    Accounting basics are introduced with primary emphasis on the costing and estimating procedures as used in industry. The objective of this course is to provide a good understanding of financial activities and hands-on experience in working with a variety of costing and accounting systems.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      INTM 410 Operations Management
    Focuses on core processes within an organization -- the activities that add value. An operations strategy depends on the industrial sector as well as the organization. This course introduces a variety of qualitative and quantitative tools for such activities as project management, process analysis, job design, forecasting, resource planning, productivity, quality, inventory, and scheduling. The objective of this course is to provide the framework for integrating approaches covered in other INTM courses.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      INTM 414 Topics in Industry
    Provides overview of multiple industrial sectors and the influences that are forcing change. All aspects of industry are considered: history of industry; inventory; supply chain; e-commerce; management; manufacturing; industrial facilities; resource management; electronics and chemical industries; alternate energies; marketing; entrepreneurship; computers as tools; and other specialty areas.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 415 Advanced Project Management
    This course covers project management in the PMP framework and provides a structured approach to managing projects using Microsoft Project and Excel. Coverage includes creation of key project management charts (Gantt, Pert, CPM, timelines and resource utilization), basic statistics used in estimating task times, critical path generation in Excel and Project, project cost justification in Excel, SPC and acceptance sampling for machine acceptance, project analysis via simulation, and management of personnel, teams, subcontractors and vendors. Case studies are utilized to demonstrate core concepts and dynamic scheduling.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 417 Construction Estimating
    General approaches for estimating construction costs are covered. Several commercially available software packages are introduced. Emphasis is on acquiring the knowledge required to develop cost estimates for construction, renovation and maintenance projects for buildings, facilities and equipment.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 427 E-Commerce
    This course reviews electronic commerce and its role in industrial organizations. Topics include a history of e-commerce, business-to-business (B2B) models, and business-to-consumer (B2C) models. The impact of this paradigm shift on all aspects of business is also covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 430 Transportation
    This course covers transportation practices and strategies for the 21st century. The role and importance of transportation in the economy and its relationship to the supply chain will be covered in detail. Transportation modes - trucks, rail, air, and water - will be examined for both domestic and global transportation. Costing and pricing strategies and issues will be discussed as well as security issues in domestic and international transportation.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 431 Manufacturing Processes for Electronics and Electrical Systems
    The materials used in Electronic and Electrical (E&E) manufacturing will be reviewed including materials and components that are used to produce chips, PCBs, and wiring systems. Focus will be on the processes for producing the range of parts and products included in this broad sector. Automation for producing parts and assemblies will be covered. Techniques covered will include surface-mounted technology (SMT), wave soldering, automation insertion, automated inspection, etc. The industrial structure that makes up this sector of manufacturing will be covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 441 Supply Chain Management
    This course covers the full range of activities involved in the supply chain. This includes management tools for optimizing of supply chains, relationships with other parts of the organization, in-house versus third party approaches, and suitable performance measurements. Topics covered include: Warehouse Management Systems (WMS), Transportation Management Systems (TMS), Advanced Planning and Scheduling Systems (APS), as well as cost benefit analysis to determine the most appropriate approach.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 443 Purchasing
    Purchasing responsibilities, processes, and procedures are included. Topics covered include: supplier selection and administration, qualification of new suppliers, preparing purchase orders, negotiating price and delivery, strategic customer/vendor relationships, and resolution of problems. All aspects of Supplier Relation Management (SRM) are covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      INTM 460 Sustainability of Critical Materials
    This course explores the limitations in supply and the need for sustainable use of carbon and non-carbon-based materials such as oil, minerals, food, water, and other natural resources used by industry. Limitations in the global availability of such resources pose challenges to industry which will require careful consideration and planning to ensure continued prosperity for current and future generations. Course will cover strategies and options to mitigate anticipated shortages and optimize the use of non-renewable natural resources, review of fuel and raw material pricing, and cost/benefit analysis of sustainable development proposals. Technical analyses will be presented during class discussions, but a technical background is not required.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 508 Cost Management
    Accounting basics are introduced with primary emphasis on the costing and estimating procedures as used in industry. The objective of this course is to provide a good understanding of financial activities and hands-on experience in working with a variety of costing and accounting systems.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      INTM 511 Industrial Leadership
    Supervision and management practices are key to all components and sectors of industry. People are the key resources and their effective use is critical to a successful operation. As companies move to become high performance organizations, traditional management tools and techniques have to be reviewed and reconsidered. Skills covered include motivation, developing consensus, conflict avoidance and negotiations. Group dynamics along with handling of individual workers is critical.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 515 Advanced Project Management
    This course covers project management in the PMP framework and provides a structured approach to managing projects using Microsoft Project and Excel. Coverage includes creation of key project management charts (Gantt, Pert, CPM, timelines and resource utilization), basic statistics used in estimating task times, critical path generation in Excel and Project, project cost justification in Excel, SPC and acceptance sampling for machine, project analysis via simulation, and management of personnel, teams subcontractors and vendors. Case studies are utilized to demonstrate core concepts and dynamic scheduling.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 530 Transportation
    This course covers transportation practices and strategies for the 21st century. The role and importance of transportation in the economy and its relationship to the supply chain will be covered in detail. Transportation modes -- trucks, rail, air, and water -- will be examined for both domestic and global transportation. Costing and pricing strategies and issues will be discussed as well as security issues in domestic and international transportation.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 532 Manufacturing Processes for Electronics and Electrical Systems
    The materials used in Electronic and Electrical (E&E) manufacturing will be reviewed including materials and components that are used to produce chips, PCBs, and wiring systems. Focus will be on the processes for producing the range of parts and products included in this broad sector. Automation for producing parts and assemblies will be covered. Techniques covered will include surface mounted technology (SMT), wave soldering, automation insertion, automated inspection, etc. The industrial structure that makes up this sector of manufacturing will be covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 540 Supply Chain Management
    This course covers the full range of activities involved in the supply chain. This includes management tools for optimizing of supply chains, relationships with other parts of the organization, in-house versus third party approaches, and suitable performance measurements. Topics covered include Warehouse Management Systems (WMS), Transportation Management Systems (TMS), Advanced Planning and Scheduling Systems (APS) as well as cost benefit analysis to determine the most appropriate approach.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 543 Purchasing
    Purchasing responsibilities, processes, and procedures are included. Topics covered include: supplier selection and administration, qualification of new suppliers, preparing purchase orders, negotiating price and delivery, strategic customer/vendor relationships, and resolution of problems. All aspects of Supplier Relation Management (SRM) are covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    INTM 545 Strategic International Business
    Organizational involvement in international business activities -- whether sourcing material and designs, expanding product sales and reach, or creating economies of scale and scope -- requires an understanding of various factors in international finance, marketing, and strategy. This course brings together these disciplines to explore financial factors that may add or transform risks, the necessary adjustments in the creation of global marketing strategy, and the strategies for creating and preserving a competitive advantage in the international arena.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      INTM 560 Sustainability of Critical Materials
    This course explores the limitations in supply and the need for sustainable use of carbon and non-carbon-based materials such as oil, minerals, food, water, and other natural resources used by industry. Limitations in the global availability of such resources pose challenges to industry which will require careful consideration and planning to ensure continued prosperity for current and future generations. Course will cover strategies and options to mitigate anticipated shortages and optimize the use of non-renewable natural resources, review of fuel and raw material pricing, and cost/benefit analysis of sustainable development proposals. Technical analyses will be presented during class discussions, but a technical background is not required.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      IPRO 497 Interprofessional Project (IPRO)
    Interprofessional projects allow students to learn teamwork, leadership and project management skills, while working in multidisciplinary teams on projects involving technical, ethical, environmental, economic, public policy, and legal issues. IPRO project teams are typically comprised of 10-12 students from sophomore through graduate level and from all disciplines that can contribute to a project. Every effort will be made to accommodate students' first choices; however, it may be necessary to balance students across all projects scheduled for the semester or to consolidate students into fewer projects to meet minimum team requirement. Specific rules about selection of IPRO projects may apply to certain degree programs. Some projects may carry Humanities or Social Science credit. Students are encouraged to consult the lead faculty member for the project and their faculty advisor before registering for a project.(1-6-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMD 411 Intermediate Software Development
    This course covers a broad spectrum of object-oriented programming concepts and application programming interfaces. The student considers the details of object-orientated development in topics of multi-threading, data structure collections, stream I/O and client interfaces. Software engineering topics of packaging and deployment are covered as well. Hands-on exercises reinforce concepts taught throughout the course.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 311 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      ITMD 415 Advanced Software Development
    This course considers Web container application development for enterprise systems. The primary focus is on database connectivity (JDBC) integration with Web application programming using an enterprise-level application framework. A Web application term project considers the design and implementation of a database instance that serves as the information tier in a contemporary 3-tier enterprise solution.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 411 with min. grade of D) OR (ITMD 411 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
      ITMD 421 Data Modeling and Applications
    Basic data modeling concepts are introduced. Hands-on database design, implementation, and administration of single-user and shared multi-user database applications using a contemporary relational database management system.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMD 422 Advanced Database Management
    Advanced topics in database management and programming including client server application development are introduced. Expands knowledge of data modeling concepts and introduces object-oriented data modeling techniques. Students will learn the use of Structured Query Language in a variety of application and operating system environments.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 421 with min. grade of D) OR (ITM 421 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ITMD 460 Fundamentals of Multimedia
    Students are introduced to computer-based multimedia theory, concepts, and applications. Topics include desktop publishing, hypermedia, presentation graphics, graphic images, animation, sound, video, multimedia on the World Wide Web and integrated multimedia authoring techniques.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMD 461 Internet Technologies and Web Design
    This course will cover the creation of Web pages and sites using HTML, CSS, Javascript and graphical applications. Networked multimedia distribution technologies are also explored. The design of effective Web site including page layout, user interface design, graphic design, content flow and site structure as well as management of Web site resources including intranet management and design considerations are addressed. Students design and create a major Web site with multiple pages and cross-linked structures.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMD 462 Web Site Application Development
    Programming the Common Gateway Interface (CGI) for Web pages is introduced with emphasis on creation of interfaces to handle HTML form data. CGI programming is taught in multiple languages. Security of Web sites is covered with an emphasis on controlled access sites. Setup, administration and customization of content management systems including blog and portal sites is introduced. Students design and create a Web site including basic CGI programs with Web interfaces and process data flows from online forms with basic database structures.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 461 with min. grade of D) OR (ITMD 461 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
      ITMD 463 Intermediate Web Application Development
    In-depth examination of the concepts involved in the development of Internet applications. Students will learn the differences and similarities between Internet applications and traditional client/server applications. A discussion of the technologies involved in creating these Internet applications is included, and students will learn to use these technologies to create robust server-side applications(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 411 with min. grade of D and ITM 461 with min. grade of D) OR (ITMD 411 with min. grade of D and ITMD 461 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
      ITMD 515 Advanced Software Programming
    This course considers Web container application development for enterprise systems. The primary focus is on database connectivity (JDBC) integration with Web application programming using an enterprise-level application framework. A Web application term project considers the design and implementation of a database instance that serves as the information tier in a contemporary 3-tier enterprise solution.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 411) OR (ITMD 411)] Corequisite: None
    ITMD 562 Web Site Application Development
    Programming the Common Gateway Interface (CGI) for Web pages is introduced with emphasis on creation of interfaces to handle HTML form data. CGI programming is taught in multiple languages. Security of Web sites is covered with an emphasis on controlled access sites. Setup, administration and customization of content management systems including blog and portal sites is introduced. Students design and create a Web site including basic CGI programs with Web interfaces and process data flows from online forms with basic database structures.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 461) OR (ITMD 461)] Corequisite: None
      ITMD 563 Intermediate Web Application Development
    In-depth examination of the concepts involved in the development of Internet applications. Students will learn the differences and similarities between Internet applications and traditional client/server applications. A discussion of the technologies involved in creating these Internet applications is included, and students will learn to use these technologies to create robust server-side applications.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 411) OR (ITMD 411)] AND [(ITM 461) OR (ITMD 461)] Corequisite: None
      ITMM 470 Fundamentals of Management for Technology Professionals
    This course explores fundamentals of management for professionals in high-technology fields. It addresses the challenges of the following: managing technical professionals and technology assets; human resource management; budgeting and managerial accounting; management of services, infrastructure, outsourcing, and vendor relationships; technology governance and strategy; and resource planning.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMM 471 Project Management for Information Technology and Management
    Basic principles of project management are taught with a particular focus on project planning for information technology hardware, software and networking project implementation. Management of application development and major Web development projects will also be addressed.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMM 570 Fundamentals of Management for Technology Professionals
    This course explores fundamentals of management for professionals in high-technology fields. It addresses the challenges of the following: managing technical professionals and technology assets; human resource management; budgeting and managerial accounting; management of services, infrastructure, outsourcing, and vendor relationships; technology governance and strategy; and resource planning.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMM 571 Project Manangement for Information Technology Management
    Project Management for Information Technology Management Basic principles of project management are taught. Includes software development concepts of requirements analysis, object modeling and design and software testing. Management of application development and major Web development projects will also be addressed.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMM 572 Process Engineering for Information Technology Managers
    This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills to define, model, measure and improve business processes. The course will focus on re-engineering processes through the application of technology to achieve significant and measurable improvement. The course will explore the latest industry standards and students will use state-of-the-art software tools for hands-on experiential learning.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 471) OR (ITM 571) OR (ITMM 471) OR (ITMM 571)] Corequisite: None
      ITMM 586 Information Technology Auditing
    Industry standard practices and standards in the auditing of information technology in an organization are addressed, with a particular emphasis on examination of IT governance, assets, controls, and control techniques. Specific areas covered will include the audit process, IT governance, systems and infrastructure life cycle management, IT service delivery and support, protection of information assets, and business continuity and disaster recovery. Students will examine case studies and complete hands-on exercises.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMO 417 Shell Scripting for System Administration
    Focuses on preparation of shell scripts to enhance and streamline system administration tasks in all contemporary server operating systems. Scripting will be taught in both native and portable environments. The course will address shell programming, regular expressions, common and system-specific shell utilities and built-in commands, user defined and shell variables, flow control structures, shell functions, and the creation and execution of shell scripts. Homework and hands-on exercises will provide practical experience in contemporary server environments. Same as ITMO 517.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMO 440 Introduction to Data Networking and the Internet
    This course covers current and evolving data network technologies, protocols, network components, and the networks that use them, focusing on the Internet and related LANs. The state of worldwide networking and its evolution will be discussed. This course covers the Internet architecture, organization, and protocols including Ethernet, 802.11, routing, the TCP/UDP/IP suite, DNS, SNMP, DHCP, and more. Students will be presented with Internet-specific networking tools for searching, testing, debugging, and configuring networks and network-connected host computers. There will be opportunities for network configuration and hands-on use of tools.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMO 444 Cloud Computing Technologies
    Computing applications hosted on dynamically-scaled virtual resources available as services are considered. Collaborative and non-collaborative "cloud-resident" applications are analyzed with respect to cost, device/location independence, scalability, reliability, security, and sustainability. Commercial and local cloud architectures are examined. A group-based integration of course topics will result in a project employing various cloud computing technologies.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ITMD 411 with min. grade of D and ITMO 456 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
      ITMO 517 Shell Scripting for System Administration
    Focuses on preparation of shell scripts to enhance and streamline system administration tasks in all contemporary server operating systems. Scripting will be taught in both native and portable environments. The course will address shell programming, regular expressions, common and system-specific shell utilities and built-in commands, user defined and shell variables, flow control structures, shell functions, and the creation and execution of shell scripts. Homework and hands-on exercises will provide practical experience in contemporary server environments. Same as ITMO 417.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMO 540 Introduction to Data Networks and the Internet
    This course covers current and evolving data network technologies, protocols, network components, and the networks that use them, focusing on the Internet and related LANs. The state of worldwide networking and its evolution will be discussed. This course covers the Internet architecture, organization, and protocols including Ethernet, 802.11, routing, the TCP/UDP/IP suite, DNS, SNMP, DHCP, and more. Students will be presented with Internet-specific networking tools for searching, testing, debugging, and configuring networks and network-connected host computers. There will be opportunities for network configuration and hands-on use of tools.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMO 542 Wireless Technologies and Applications
    This course will provide students with the knowledge of wireless communication technologies. The course will focus on the 3G and 4G wireless networks such as UMTS, LTE, and WiMAX. Students will have the opportunity to study the different wireless networks architectures and major network elements including devices, base stations, base station controller, and core networks. Major topics of the course include air interfaces, protocols, session management, QoS, security, mobility, and handoff.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMO 544 Cloud Computing Technologies
    Computing applications hosted on dynamically-scaled, virtual resources available as services are considered. Collaborative and non-collaborative "cloud-resident" applications are analyzed with respect to cost, device/location independence, scalability, reliability, security, and sustainability. Commercial and local cloud architectures are examined. A group-based integration of course topics will result in a project employing various cloud computing technologies.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMO 546 Telecommunications Over Data Networks
    This course covers a suite of application protocols known as Voice over IP (VoIP). It describes important protocols within that suite including RTP, SDP, MGCP and SIP and the architecture of various VoIP installations including on-net to on-net to PSATN and inter-domain scenarios. the functions of the Network Elements that play significant roles in this architecture will be defined. Examples of network elements that are currently available as products will be examined.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMO 557 Storage Technologies
    Modern enterprise data storage technologies and architectures are examined in depth. Topics include storage devices, file systems, storage networks, virtual storage, RAID, NAS, SAN, and other current enterprise-level storage models. Storage management, replication, deduplication, storage tiers, backups as well as fundamentals of business continuity, application workload, system integration, and storage/system administration are addressed. Specific knowledge and skills required to configure networked storage to include archive, backup, and restoration technologies are covered.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMS 428 Database Security
    Students will engage in an in-depth examination of topics in data security including security considerations in applications and systems development, encryption methods, cryptography law and security architecture and models.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 421 with min. grade of D) OR (ITMD 421 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
      ITMS 443 Vulnerability Analysis and Control
    This course addresses hands-on ethical hacking, penetration testing, and detection of malicious probes and their prevention. It provides students with in-depth theoretical and practical knowledge of the vulnerabilities of networks of computers including the networks themselves, operating systems, and important applications. Integrated with the lectures are laboratories focusing on the use of open source and freeware tools; students will learn in a closed environment to probe, penetrate, and hack other networks. It is recommended, but not required, that students also take ITMS 448 prior to or in parallel with this course.(2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMS 478 Cyber Security Management
    In-depth examination of topics in the management of information technology security including access control systems and methodology, business continuity and disaster recovery planning, legal issues in information system security, ethics, computer operations security, physical security and security architecture & models using current standards and models(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMS 528 Database Security
    Students will engage in an in-depth examination of topics in data security including security considerations in applications & systems development, encryption methods, cryptography law, and security architecture & models.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ITM 421) OR (ITMD 421)] Corequisite: None
      ITMS 543 Vulnerability Analysis and Control
    This course addresses hands-on ethical hacking, penetration testing, and detection of malicious probes and their prevention. It provides students with in-depth theoretical and practical knowledge of the vulnerabilities of networks of computers including the networks themselves, operating systems and important applications. Integrated with the lectures are laboratories focusing on the use of open source and freeware tools; students will learn in a closed environment to probe, penetrate and hack other networks(2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ITMS 578 Cyber Security Management
    In-depth examination of topics in the management of information technology security including access control systems & methodology, business continuity & disaster recovery planning, legal issues in information system security, ethics, computer operations security, physical security and security architecture & models using current standards and models.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMT 495 Topics: Intro to Healthcare IT
    This course will cover a particular topic varying from semester to semester in which there is particular student or staff interest.(Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMT 495 Topics: Mainframe Technologies
    This course will cover a particular topic varying from semester to semester in which there is particular student or staff interest.(Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMT 531 Object-Oriented System Analysis, Modeling and Design
    This course will cover object oriented approaches to system analysis, data modeling and design that combine both process and data views of systems. Emphasis is given to practical problems and the techniques needed to create solutions in systems design.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMT 535 Data Center Architecture
    The course deals with building integrated data center information infrastructures, including facility, hardware, software, and network components as solutions to particular enterprise information management needs and requirements. Students will learn critical elements of modern data center design including physical plant construction; network infrastructure; data storage technologies; power provisioning and conditioning; environmental controls and HVAC; system and physical security; modular component use; and planning for growth.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMT 595 Topics: Intro to Healthcare IT
    This course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest.(Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      ITMT 595 Topics: Mainframe Technologies
    This course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest.(Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      MATH 565 Monte Carlo Methods in Finance
    In addition to the theoretical constructs in financial mathematics, there are also a range of computational/simulation techniques that allow for the numerical evaluation of a wide range of financial securities. This course will introduce the student to some such simulation techniques, known as Monte Carlo methods, with focus on applications in financial risk management. Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo techniques are computational sampling methods which track the behavior of the underlying securities in an option or portfolio and determine the derivative's value by taking the expected value of the discounted payoffs at maturity. Recent developments with parallel programming techniques and computer clusters have made these methods widespread in the finance industry.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(MATH 474) OR (Graduate Business Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    MMAE 200 Introduction to Mechanics
    Equilibrium concepts. Statics of a particle. Statics of a system of particles and rigid bodies. Distributed forces, centroids and center of gravity. Friction. Kinetics of particles: Newton's Laws of motion, energy and momentum. Kinematics of particles. Dynamics of rotating bodies .(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(MATH 152* with min. grade of D and PHYS 123 with min. grade of D)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
    MMAE 202 Mechanics of Solids
    Stress and strain relations, mechanical properties. Axially loaded members. Torsion of circular shafts. Plane stress and strain, Mohr's circle, stress transformation. Elementary bending theory, normal and shear stresses in beams, beam deflection. Combined loading.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(MMAE 200 with min. grade of D) OR (MMAE 201 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
      MMAE 232 Design for Innovation
    Product design and development including engineering design, good versus bad design, human-centered design, sketch models and prototyping, material selection, sustainable product development, product tear down, and product architecture. Global topics encompassing intellectual property, innovative thinking, global competitiveness, business economics, and managing product development.(1-3-3) Prerequisite: [(MMAE 100 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    MMAE 302 Advanced Mechanics of Solids
    Analysis of stress and strain. Torsional and bending structural elements. Energy methods and Castigliano's theorems. Curved beams and springs. Thick-walled cylinders and spinning disks. Pressure vessels. Contact stresses. Stability of columns. Stress concentration and stress intensity factors. Theories of failure, yield, and fracture. Fatigue.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(MATH 251 with min. grade of D, MATH 252 with min. grade of D, MMAE 202 with min. grade of D, and MMAE 232 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
      MMAE 419 Mechanical Laboratory II
    Laboratory testing methods including solid mechanics: tension, torsion, hardness, impact, toughness, fatigue and creep; heat and mass transfer: conduction, fins, convection, radiation, diffusion; vibrations and control. Design of experiments.(2-3-4) Prerequisite: [(MMAE 302 with min. grade of D)] AND [(MMAE 315 with min. grade of D) OR (MMAE 319 with min. grade of D)] AND [(MMAE 323 with min. grade of D)] AND [(MMAE 443* with min. grade of D)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
    MMAE 468 Introduction to Ceramic Materials
    The structure and structure/properties relationships of ceramic materials. Topics include: crystal structure types; crystal defects; structure of class; phase equilibria and how these affect applications for mechanical properties; electrical properties; and magnetic properties. Sintering and ceramic reactions are related to microstructure and resultant properties.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(MS 201 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
    MMAE 485 Manufacturing Processes
    Principles of material forming and removal processes and equipment. Force and power requirements, surface integrity, final properties and dimensional accuracy as influenced by material properties and process variables. Design for manufacturing. Factors influencing choice of manufacturing process.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(MMAE 332 with min. grade of D) OR (MMAE 372 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      MMAE 501 Engineering Analysis I
    Vectors and matrices, systems of linear equations, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, systems of ordinary differential equations, decomposition of matrices, and functions of matrices. Eigenfunction expansions of differential equations, self-adjoint differential operators, Sturm-Liouville equations. Complex variables, analytic functions and Cauchy-Riemann equations, harmonic functions, conformal mapping, and boundary-value problems. Calculus of variations, Euler's equation, constrained functionals, Rayleigh-Ritz method, Hamilton's principle, optimization and control. Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in differential equations.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      MMAE 510 Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics
    Kinematics of fluid motion. Constitutive equations of isotropic viscous compressible fluids. Derivation of Navier-Stokes equations. Lessons from special exact solutions, self-similarity. Admissibility of idealizations and their applications; inviscid, adiabatic, irrotational, incompressible, boundary-layer, quasi one-dimensional, linearized and creeping flows. Vorticity theorems. Unsteady Bernoulli equation. Basic flow solutions. Basic features of turbulent flows.(4-0-4) Prerequisite: [(MMAE 501*)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
      MMAE 569 Advanced Physical Metallurgy
    Thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations, theory of nucleation and growth, metastability, phase diagrams.Prerequisite: Background in phase diagrams and thermodynamics. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      MMAE 589 Applications in Reliability Engineering I
    This first part of a two-course sequence focuses on the primary building blocks that enable an engineer to effectively communicate and contribute as a part of a reliability engineering effort. Students develop an understanding of the long term and intermediate goals of a reliability program and acquire the necessary knowledge and tools to meet these goals. The concepts of both probabilistic and deterministic design are presented, along with the necessary supporting understanding that enables engineers to make design trade-offs that achieve a positive impact on the design process. Strengthening their ability to contribute in a cross functional environment, students gain insight that helps them understand the reliability engineering implications associated with a given design objective, and the customer's expectations associated with the individual product or product platforms that integrate the design. These expectations are transformed into metrics against which the design can be measured. A group project focuses on selecting a system, developing a flexible reliability model, and applying assessment techniques that suggest options for improving the design of the system.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      PHYS 405 Fundamentals of Quantum Theory I
    A review of modern physics including topics such as blackbody radiation, the photoelectric effect, the Compton effect, the Bohr model of the hydrogen atom, the correspondence principle, and the DeBroglie hypothesis. Topics in one-dimensional quantum mechanics such as the particle in an infinite potential well, reflection and transmission from potential wells, barriers, and steps, the finite potential well and the quantum harmonic oscillator. General topics such as raising and lowering operators, Hermitian operators, commutator brackets and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle are also covered. Many particle systems and the Pauli Exclusion Principle are discussed. Three-dimensional quantum mechanical systems, orbital angular momentum, the hydrogen atom.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(MATH 252 with min. grade of D, PHYS 308* with min. grade of D, and PHYS 348 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
      PHYS 570 Introduction to Synchrotron Radiation
    Production and characterization of synchrotron radiation, dynamical and kinematical diffraction, absorption and scattering processes, x-ray optics for synchrotron radiation and x-ray detectors. Overview of experimental techniques including XAFS, XPS, SAXS, WAXS, diffraction, inelastic x-ray scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, microprobe, tomography and optical spectroscopy.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      PHYS 571 Radiation Physics
    Fundamentals of health physics will be presented with an emphasis on problem-solving. Topics covered begin with the physics of radiation production: review of atomic and nuclear structure and quantum mechanics; radioactivity; and production of x-rays. The second part of the course focuses on the interaction of radiation with matter including energy-loss mechanisms, secondary processes, stopping power, and range.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
      PHYS 575 Case Studies in Health Physics
    Issues in operational health physics and regulatory affairs. Students will present problems and solutions drawn from their experience and the literature. Operational problems may include organizational issues, computer applications, measurements and dosimetry. Methods for compliance with EPA, NRC, and OSHA and enforcement actions will emphasize technical and management techniques.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(PHYS 572)] Corequisite: None
      PHYS 576 Radiation Dosimetry
    This course is to study the science and technique of determining radiation dose and is fundamental to evaluating radiation hazards and risks to humans. This course covers both external dosimetry for radiation sources that are outside the human body and internal dosimetry for intake of radioactive materials into the human body. Topics will include: dosimetry recommendations of ICRP for occupational exposure; US NRC and DOE requirements for particular work environments; and MIRD methodology for medical use of radionuclides.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(PHYS 571* and PHYS 572)] An asterisk (*) designates a course which may be taken concurrently. Corequisite: None
      PSYC 410 Introduction to Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling
    Historical, philosophical, ethical, and legal bases of rehabilitation and mental health counseling. Includes a study of professional roles, functions, and responsibilities as well as service delivery systems and practices such as vocational, independent living, and public and private rehabilitation and mental health counseling.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(PSYC 221 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      PSYC 411 Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions
    Survey of human organ systems, medical terminology, unique characteristics of disabling conditions, including severe disabilities. Vocational consequences, environmental impact and implications for the rehabilitation process. One of a two course sequence.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(PSYC 221 with min. grade of D) OR (PSYC 222 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Doctoral Student) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      PSYC 481 Groups and Leadership at Work
    The course will review a system's model of groups and will discuss developmental stages of groups as they relate to communication behaviors. It will also review various approaches to leadership including individual, contingency, and relationship. The course engages students in various activities to help them become aware of themselves as team members and team leaders.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(PSYC 221 with min. grade of D and PSYC 301 with min. grade of D) OR (Graduate Student)] Corequisite: None
      PSYC 554 Survey of Multivariate Statistics
    Introduction to the major multivariate statistical procedures used in psychology; factor analysis, discriminant analysis, multivariate analysis of variance and canonical correlation.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(PSYC 545) OR (PSYC 546)] Corequisite: None
      PSYC 585 Rehabilitation Engineering Technology III
    Seminar designed to accompany and enhance practical RET experiences, such as concurrent internship, employment or approved projects involving RET/AT applications. Case presentations of technology for independent living, issues of quality of outcome, alternatives/appropriateness of technology solutions, ethics, emotional aspects of technology acquisition, independence/dependency and barriers to acquiring and deployment of AT are discussed.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(PSYC 583 and PSYC 584)] Corequisite: None
    TECH 581 Consulting for Technical Professionals
    This course explores the application of technology and technical management skills to working with business, industry, or various professions in solving specific problems for an organization as an internal or external consultant. Students learn how to involve clients in all phases of problem identification and solution with the goal that, at the end of a consulting assignment, the clients are able to sustain the necessary changes in their organization. Particular attention is paid to managing expectations among change agents, managers, executives, technical professionals, and other members of the organization. The course will cover the most critical, high-level, functional frameworks used by top consulting firms today as well as the tools commonly used by consulting professionals.(3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    Last modified: Jun. 17, 2013
    Last modified: 02/26/2014 16:27:50

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